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7 day average of new cases in Wisconsin drops below 6,000 for first time since Nov. 11, 6 new COVID-19 deaths reported

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Published: Nov. 23, 2020 at 2:18 PM CST
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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) - The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) says more than 3,000 people have tested positive in the latest batch of coronavirus test results.

On Monday, health officials say out of the 12,291 new coronavirus test results that were received in the past 24-hour period, 3,095 tests positive -- a positivity rate of 25.18%, or one out of every four. This marks a fifth day of decline for new cases, and according to our records, is the second day in a row of positivity rate at or below 25%.

The 7-day average for new cases decreased Monday to 5,859. On Sunday, that average was 6,044. The state hasn’t seen a 7 day average below 6,000 cases since November 11.

There were 9,196 negative tests in the latest batch of results.

The DHS reports six new deaths from COVID-19 Monday after reporting no new deaths Sunday. The cumulative death toll remains at 3,011. COVID-19 is currently the fourth leading cause of death in Wisconsin. The state is averaging 52 deaths per day over the last 7 days. The death percentage is currently 0.84%.

Case and death numbers by county are listed later in this article.

RELATED: Fauci discusses COVID-19 in Wisconsin

Gov. Tony Evers issued a new face coverings order Friday. Under the order, anyone age 5 or older has to wear a face covering whenever they’re indoors or in an enclosed space with someone from outside their household. The governor cited the rising number of hospitalizations putting a strain on hospitals in issuing the new public health order. He noted that it’s not just affecting patients with COVID-19; there are fewer beds, less staffing and fewer resources available for people who need to be hospitalized for other reasons, like heart attacks, strokes and accidents.

Health Secretary-designee Andrea Palm issued a statement, “We know hospitalizations are a lagging indicator, which means we will need even more capacity for our hospitals in the coming weeks with our current cases. We need every Wisconsinite to take this seriously to stay home. That is why it is imperative we take action to curb transmission now.”

The DHS says 107 COVID-19 patients were hospitalized in the last 24 hours.

Monday’s report from the Wisconsin Hospital Association says there are currently 1,999 COVID-19 in hospitals, an increase from Sunday’s report of 1,988. Of those, 438 are in intensive care, an increase of 10 from Sunday. The alternate care facility -- the field hospital at the state fairgrounds -- is treating 13 patients, a decrease of eight from Sunday.

The state says 15,930 people have been hospitalized for COVID-19 treatment since the first coronavirus case was confirmed in Madison less than 10 months ago.

A total 357,771 coronavirus cases have been confirmed in Wisconsin. The state says 20.8% of all of these cases are active, or 74,340 people diagnosed with the COVID-19 virus in the past 30 days and haven’t been medically cleared. That percentage has dropped steadily since Thursday, when it was reported at 22.3%. There are 280,358 people diagnosed with the virus who are considered recovered.

LEADING CAUSES OF DEATH

This year, COVID-19 has killed more people in Wisconsin than the flu and pneumonia, suicide and kidney disease in 2018 combined. The virus now compares to the 4th leading cause of death in Wisconsin, behind heart disease, cancer and accidents, based on the CDC’s 2018 mortality report, the latest ranked mortality figures available.

The CDC mortality figures are based on 12 months. Wisconsin’s first COVID-19 deaths were reported 8 months ago.

HOSPITAL READINESS

According to the Wisconsin Hospital Association, as of Monday the state’s 134 hospitals have 207 open ICU beds, or 14.12% of the state’s ICU beds. It further indicates 15.46% of all hospital beds are open for intensive care, intermediate care, medical surgical and negative flow isolation.

The Fox Valley region’s 13 hospitals have a total of nine ICU beds open, or 6.7%, and four intermediate care beds. Overall, 10.66 of all hospital beds are open in that region serving eight counties. The hospitals are treating 133 COVID-19 patients, including 18 in ICU.

The Northeast region’s 10 hospitals have 22 ICU beds open, which is 10.63% of the seven-county region’s ICU beds, and 17.25% of all beds are available overall. Those hospitals are caring for 172 COVID-19 patients, 51 in ICU.

Hospital bed availability can fluctuate widely from day to day with new admissions, deaths, discharges for patients being treated for all conditions, not just COVID-19. An open bed doesn’t necessarily mean it’s available for a patient if the hospital doesn’t have the staff -- doctors, nurses, even food workers -- to support it.

The need for supplies remains unchanged from the weekend. 23 hospitals report less than a week’s supply of gowns – a number steady from Friday and an improvement from 25 on Thursday -- while 13 are short on paper medical masks, 9 hospitals need goggles, and 7 need N95 masks.

MONDAY’S COUNTY CASE NUMBERS (Counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold.)*

Wisconsin*

  • Adams - 986 cases (+9) (6 deaths)
  • Ashland - 587 cases (+7) (8 deaths)
  • Barron – 3,307 cases (+57) (37 deaths)(+1)
  • Bayfield - 621 cases (+5) (7 deaths)
  • Brown – 21,212 cases (+56) (127 deaths)
  • Buffalo – 733 cases (+18) (4 deaths)
  • Burnett – 706 cases (+2) (10 deaths)
  • Calumet - 3,882 cases (+20) (25 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 4,304 cases (+49) (45 deaths)
  • Clark – 1,976 cases (+15) (33 deaths)
  • Columbia – 3,161 cases (+40) (10 deaths)
  • Crawford – 837 cases (+22) (6 deaths)(+1)
  • Dane – 25,066 cases (+200) (75 deaths)
  • Dodge – 7,767 cases (+70) (66 deaths)
  • Door - 1,527 cases (+2) (11 deaths)
  • Douglas – 1,788 cases (+50) (1 death)
  • Dunn – 2,446 cases (+33) (8 deaths)
  • Eau Claire – 7,250 cases (+68) (54 deaths)
  • Florence - 304 cases (11 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 7,973 cases (+114) (40 deaths)(State revised, decrease of 1)
  • Forest - 694 cases (+3) (16 deaths)
  • Grant – 3,238 cases (+35) (58 deaths)(+1)
  • Green – 1,552 cases (+10) (5 deaths)
  • Green Lake - 1,133 cases (+12) (5 deaths)
  • Iowa - 1,200 cases (+20) (4 deaths)
  • Iron - 326 cases (6 deaths)
  • Jackson - 1,584 cases (+11) (4 deaths)
  • Jefferson – 4,907 cases (+58) (33 deaths)
  • Juneau - 1,793 cases (+16) (7 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 8,473 cases (+48) (124 deaths)(+1)
  • Kewaunee - 1,568 cases (+1) (15 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 7,401 cases (+61) (32 deaths)
  • Lafayette - 1,030 cases (+8) (3 deaths)
  • Langlade - 1,456 cases (+9) (24 deaths)
  • Lincoln – 1,801 cases (+27) (22 deaths)
  • Manitowoc – 4,567 cases (+40) (33 deaths)
  • Marathon – 9,048 cases (+83) (113 deaths)
  • Marinette - 2,760 cases (+28) (25 deaths)
  • Marquette - 996 cases (+2) (12 deaths)
  • Menominee - 536 cases (2 deaths)
  • Milwaukee – 62,571 (+832) (700 deaths)
  • Monroe - 2,328 cases (+24) (11 deaths)
  • Oconto – 2,995 cases (+14) (23 deaths)
  • Oneida - 2,154 cases (+14) (28 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 13,108 cases (+73) (113 deaths)
  • Ozaukee - 4,374 cases (+46) (33 deaths)
  • Pepin – 438 cases (2 deaths)
  • Pierce – 1,899 cases (+44) (17 deaths)(+1)
  • Polk – 1, 941 cases (+47) (5 deaths)
  • Portage – 4,414 cases (+42) (35 deaths)
  • Price - 669 cases (+10) (3 deaths)
  • Racine – 13,149 cases (+56) (149 deaths)
  • Richland - 823 cases (+17) (12 deaths)
  • Rock – 8,746 cases (+82) (69 deaths)
  • Rusk - 759 cases (+17) (5 deaths)
  • Sauk – 3,303 cases (+24) (16 deaths)
  • Sawyer - 795 cases (+7) (7 deaths)
  • Shawano – 3,546 cases (+12) (44 deaths)
  • Sheboygan - 8,350 cases (+3) (48 deaths)
  • St. Croix – 4,034 cases (+70) (19 deaths)
  • Taylor - 1,062 cases (+29) (10 deaths)
  • Trempealeau – 2,201 cases (+26) (12 deaths)
  • Vernon – 1,001 cases (+8) (7 deaths)
  • Vilas - 1,131 cases (+19) (11 deaths)
  • Walworth – 5,470 cases (+22) (46 deaths)
  • Washburn – 584 cases (+3) (2 deaths)
  • Washington – 8,082 cases (+85) (65 deaths)(+1)
  • Waukesha – 23,772 cases (+80) (181 deaths)
  • Waupaca – 3,512 cases (State revised, decrease of 10) (77 deaths)
  • Waushara – 1,691 cases (+12) (7 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 12,560 cases (+49) (101 deaths)
  • Wood – 3,873 cases (+89) (26 deaths)(+1)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula **

  • Alger - 146 cases (+5) (1 death)
  • Baraga - 348 cases (+16) (6 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 301 cases (+13) (4 deaths)(+2)
  • Delta – 2,084 cases (+31) (48 deaths)(+1)
  • Dickinson - 1,499 cases (+46) (28 deaths)
  • Gogebic - 534 cases (+17) (11 deaths)(+1)
  • Houghton – 1,187 cases (+16) (910deaths)(+1)
  • Iron – 652 cases (+14) (29 deaths)(+1)
  • Keweenaw – 55 cases (+3) (1 death)
  • Luce – 112 cases (+2)
  • Mackinac - 196 cases (+3)
  • Marquette - 2,352 cases (+85) (25 deaths)
  • Menominee - 1,094 cases (+18) (13 deaths)(+1)
  • Ontonagon – 242 cases (+10) (12 deaths)(+1)
  • Schoolcraft - 156 cases (+2) (1 death)

* Viewers have asked us why the state has different numbers than what’s reported on some county health department websites. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19 but would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays. Monday’s numbers include updates since Saturday’s reporting deadline.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

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