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More than 4,000 new cases confirmed Saturday, 25 new deaths reported

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Coronavirus generic(WRDW)
Published: Oct. 24, 2020 at 2:34 PM CDT
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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – State health officials say the number of new coronavirus cases has increased by more than 4,000 for the fourth time this week, but isn’t a record amount for a single day.

According to Saturday’s Department of Health Services report, out of 17,620 new tests, 4,062 came back positive. That means 13,558 people tested negative.

In addition, 25 new deaths were reported by the state.

The Wisconsin DHS has seen a total of 194,540 positive tests since testing began in February. In that same time period, 10,237 people have been hospitalized for COVID-19, out of which 199 were within the past 24 hours.

Wisconsin has now seen 1,770 people die from the disease caused by the coronavirus.

The death rate is now at 0.91% after holding steady at 0.92% for three days.

POSITIVE CASES

The 4,062 new cases is also the fourth-highest on record, but this week’s records come with an asterisk because the state upgraded its medical reporting systems last weekend which put the state behind on entering new, positive cases.

The one-day record of new tests goes back to August 4, when 18,138 tests were returned.

The positivity rate of 23.05% is in line with the percentage of positive tests we saw last Thursday and Friday before the system was taken down (24.65 and 26.47%, respectively).

This is the tenth straight report with more than 3,000 coronavirus cases. Wisconsin is averaging 4,036 new coronavirus cases every day in the last 7 reports.

As of Friday, the state reports the positivity rate’s 7-day average is at 22.7%. That’s down from its all-time high of 23.0% on Thursday.

The positivity rate including multiple tests of the same people is also on a decline to 11.9% Friday after peaking at 12.2% earlier this week. Action 2 News will continue to emphasize the state’s summary statistics counting each person once no matter how many times they’re tested. This is the standard method used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in its federal reporting and is a better indication of the spread of the coronavirus in a community. For data including all of the results for people tested multiple times, visit the DHS website.

County-by-county numbers are listed later in this article.

ACTIVE CASES

The percentage of active cases is also falling despite the number of newly diagnosed cases right now. There are 39,806 people who are considered active, meaning they were diagnosed within the past 30 days and haven’t been medically cleared. That’s 20.5% of all known coronavirus cases, down from 20.6% on Friday.

The state says almost 153,000 people (152,928) are considered recovered (78.6%).

HOSPITALIZATIONS

The state reports 199 people were hospitalized for COVID-19, which also ranks 2nd highest for any 24 hour period, behind the record 218 hospitalizations Tuesday.

Wisconsin set a new record for current hospitalizations, now at 332 patients in intensive care and 1,245 hospitalized for COVID-19 treatment overall, according to the DHS.

Since the first patient in Madison on February 5, 10,237 people have been hospitalized for COVID-19 treatment. The 7-day average is up to 174 patients per day, a new high. The rate of hospitalization for people diagnosed with the coronavirus holds steady at 5.3%.

Another patient was admitted to the alternate care facility (ACF) set up at the Wisconsin State Fair Park near Milwaukee Saturday, bringing the total number of patients there to three. The facility opened about a week ago with the intent of handling an overflow at hospitals around the state by receiving patients who are closer to discharge but not quite healthy enough, to make room for people with more serious conditions. To protect patient privacy, the DHS doesn’t say where patients are from.

HOSPITAL READINESS

In terms of hospital readiness, Friday’s report from the Wisconsin Hospital Association says 15.3% of ICU beds and 16.4% of all medical beds are open.

In the Fox Valley Region, with 13 hospitals serving 8 counties, there are 109 COVID-19 patients in hospitals, 7 fewer than Friday, with 22 in ICU, 3 more than Friday. 20 ICU beds are open.

The Northeast Region’s 10 hospitals serving 7 counties are caring for 156 COVID-19 patients, 17 fewer than Friday, including 44 in ICU, 13 fewer than Friday. The region has 26 ICU beds open and 196 open beds total.

Day-to-day changes take hospital discharges and deaths into account.

Prevea CEO/president Dr. Ashok Rai cautioned on Action 2 News This Morning last week that an open bed isn’t necessarily an available bed if the hospital doesn’t have the staffing to support a patient in it (see related story). For this reason, we’re using the term “open” more frequently than “available,” even though that’s the WHA’s terminology.

SATURDAY’S COUNTY CASE NUMBERS (counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold)*

Wisconsin

  • Adams - 447 cases (+12) (4 deaths)
  • Ashland - 257 cases (+1) (3 deaths)
  • Barron - 970 cases (+39) (6 deaths)
  • Bayfield - 204 cases (+4) (1 death)
  • Brown - 14,433 cases (+163) (89 deaths)
  • Buffalo - 242 cases (+7) (3 deaths)
  • Burnett - 292 cases (6 deaths)
  • Calumet - 2,569 cases (+49) (11 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 1,397 cases (+79) (11 deaths) (+1)
  • Clark – 793 cases (+26) (15 deaths) (-1: State revised from 16 reported Friday)
  • Columbia – 1,652 cases (+42) (5 deaths)
  • Crawford – 313 cases (+2)
  • Dane – 13,831 cases (+276) (48 deaths)(+1)
  • Dodge – 3,672 cases (+199) (27 deaths)(+3)
  • Door - 725 cases (+2) (5 deaths)(+1)
  • Douglas - 738 cases (+12) (1 death)
  • Dunn - 982 cases (+10) (1 death)
  • Eau Claire – 3.057 cases (+116) (12 deaths)
  • Florence - 206 cases (+6) (7 deaths)(+1)
  • Fond du Lac – 4,126 cases (+173) (19 deaths)
  • Forest - 442 cases (+12) (10 deaths)
  • Grant – 1,758 cases (+31) (29 deaths)(+1)
  • Green - 904 cases (+21) (5 deaths)
  • Green Lake - 692 cases (+17) (2 deaths)
  • Iowa - 432 cases (+15) (1 death)
  • Iron - 179 cases (+1) (2 deaths)(+1)
  • Jackson - 364 cases (+22) (1 death)
  • Jefferson - 2,545 cases (+99) (10 deaths)
  • Juneau - 733 cases (+14) (4 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 4,720 cases (+57) (76 deaths)(+2)
  • Kewaunee - 1,015 cases (+11) (6 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 4,025 cases (+41) (20 deaths)(+3)
  • Lafayette - 502 case (+10) (1 death)
  • Langlade - 858 cases (+55) (9 deaths)
  • Lincoln - 713 cases (+28) (7 deaths)
  • Manitowoc – 2,556 cases (+132) (10 deaths)(+1)
  • Marathon - 4,157 cases (+146) (45 deaths)
  • Marinette - 1,599 cases (+21) (11 deaths)
  • Marquette - 591 cases (+15) (2 deaths)
  • Menominee - 283 cases (+10)
  • Milwaukee – 38,108 (+221) (567 deaths) (+2)
  • Monroe - 1,052 cases (+24) (4 deaths)
  • Oconto – 2,014 cases (+43) (13 deaths)
  • Oneida - 1,158 cases (+39) (9 deaths)(+1)
  • Outagamie – 8,723 cases (+251) (62 deaths) (+2)
  • Ozaukee - 2,084 cases (+68) (23 deaths)
  • Pepin – 124 cases (+6)
  • Pierce – 655 cases (+6) (7 deaths)
  • Polk – 491 cases (+18) (2 deaths)
  • Portage - 2,565 cases (+55) (19 deaths)
  • Price - 335 cases (+6) (1 death)
  • Racine - 6,948 cases (+134) (107 deaths)
  • Richland - 433 cases (+11) (8 deaths)(+2)
  • Rock – 4,607 cases (+87) (42 deaths) (+1)
  • Rusk - 190 cases (+8) (1 death)
  • Sauk – 1,611 cases (+25) (7 deaths)
  • Sawyer - 362 cases (+6) (2 deaths)(+1)
  • Shawano – 2,287 cases (+72) (18 deaths)(+1)
  • Sheboygan - 4,375 cases (+173) (24 deaths)
  • St. Croix - 1,669 cases (+60) (11 deaths) (+1)
  • Taylor - 449 cases (+25) (7 deaths)
  • Trempealeau - 965 cases (+4) (2 deaths)
  • Vernon - 463 cases (2 deaths) (-1, state revised from DHS report of 3 on Friday)
  • Vilas - 521 cases (+12) (5 deaths)
  • Walworth - 3,282 cases (+69) (37 deaths)
  • Washburn – 223 cases (+6) (2 deaths)
  • Washington - 4,198 cases (+122) (43 deaths)
  • Waukesha – 11,615 cases (+226) (112 deaths)
  • Waupaca – 2,261 cases (+112) (39 deaths) (+1)
  • Waushara - 945 cases (+39) (5 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 8,281 cases (+122) (55 deaths) (+1)
  • Wood - 1,572 cases (+36) (9 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula**

  • Alger - 80 cases(+2) (1 death)
  • Baraga - 67 cases(+3) (4 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 71 cases (+3)
  • Delta – 1,004 cases (+30) (22 deaths)(+2)
  • Dickinson – 590 cases (+51) (17 deaths) (+1)
  • Gogebic - 259 cases (+18) (3 deaths)(+2)
  • Houghton – 755 cases (+10) (8 deaths)
  • Iron – 389 cases (+17) (20 deaths)
  • Keweenaw – 17 cases
  • Luce – 36 cases (Revised by state, -1)
  • Mackinac - 122 cases
  • Marquette - 836 cases (+42) (14 deaths) (+1)
  • Menominee - 602 cases (+16) (3 deaths)
  • Ontonagon – 81 cases (+8)
  • Schoolcraft - 62 cases (+4)

* Viewers have asked us why the state has different numbers than what’s reported on some county health department websites. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19 but would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

Health experts say face masks are still the most effective way the general public can slow the spread of the coronavirus, but only if the masks are worn appropriately -- over the nose and chin. County and state health officials are reminding and urging people to stay home when they feel sick, avoid large gatherings, and distance yourself six feet from people who aren’t from your household.

To help people understand how their decisions affect their own health and others, the Department of Health Services has a decision tool at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/decision.htm. The tool describes how choices matter and offers suggestions to make activities safer.

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